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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In our modern times where an engine management light is now compulsory on cars, it is worthwhile buying an OBII code reader, so you can check any codes if the light comes on. You just plug the code reader into the OBII diagnostic socket under the dash.

I bought a cheep one off Ebay and it can read the fault codes, and reset the engine management light to off, once you have solved the problem. The one I have here was around a tenner (£10), see picture.

It is useful to check a fault code, and then you know what the fault or faults are. Helps you narrow down the fault and this helps with trouble shooting.

If you are not into fixing cars yourself, then It is also good for checking the code if the engine management light comes on, before you hand the car in for repair, so you know roughly what the fault is.

Then you can watch that the dealership or garage is not going to deceive you, and charge you more for other non-existent faults. And yes, unfortunately many car repair business's are out to get as much cash from you as they can. So you have to beware of the problems with your car, before you hand it in, and the code reader gives you that information.

As for what the fault codes means, well you can get a list of these off the internet, or ask someone on the relevant car forum, by telling them your fault code.

Some of the more expensive code readers give you the code and what it means. My one is cheap and just gives the fault code only and I go on the internet to find what it means.

My reader is a maxiscan ms309 from Ebay....
 

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I bought one for our Rover which was before the Honda. I had read that the OB11 reader didn't work on the 'newer' vehicles. Mine came with a booklet containing the codes. Thank you colinJYD for cheering me up.


I am not computer literate BUT working with Windows 7 over the past few months it has been an absolute pig. The computer shop can find no problem, a diagnostic by the machine itself shows all the bits in good order but never the less the computer frequently goes into sulk mode. Some say it's Microsoft trying to push people onto Windows 10 whatever it drives me to distraction trying to get it to behave.


What has this to do with the OB11? Well it's nice to know something that doesn't cost the earth works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Freddy, Windows 7 is far superior to win10, and easy to reinstate if things go wrong by going back to factory settings. Win 7 is what I use.

Anyway my OBII code reader paid for itself a few months back when my wife's Smart Fortwo acted up by gong into limp mode (car has no power), and the engine management light came on.

The code read P0299.....
The P0299 DTC code refers to a condition where the PCM/ECM (powertrain/engine control module) has detected that the bank "A" or single turbocharger or supercharger is not providing a normal amount of boost air (pressure).

So the first and cheapest solution according to the fault solutions was to replace air filter, and so I reset the code using the OBD code reader, and replaced with new air filter at £10 from Ebay, and all was fine, as original filter was very dirty and partially blocked. Fault solved.

This was a lot cheaper than handing the car in for repair.
 

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Well, that is a clear case of where an OB11 meter can pay for itself. Last year, when Autoglass replaced the rear window in the Honda, the technician was South African and was bemoaning the poor service he was getting from his local Merc dealership. He had a 'Braban'? Smart Four. The people that breath on Merc and Smart cars. His had two spark plugs to each cylinder and despite the garage lifting a not inconsiderable sum off him for servicing it wasn't running properly. Well, he borrowed a meter ( presumably an OB11) and found it was spark plugs on all four cylinders causing the problem. Having just paid for new spark plugs he was not best pleased and on investigation he found the spark plugs difficult to reach had not been changed. When he challenged the dealer, their excuse was they didn't know that his model had eight spark plugs.
I am sorry to say this is not the only example of poor Mercedes servicing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mercedes dealerships is the only bad experience of Smart cars. I never go near them nowadays.

The problem is that mecedes only want to deal with Merc car owners with their fat wallets. As for smart cars well they look on those as toys, and we are classed as second class citizens. We get poor service, overpriced repairs, totally neglected in the showroom. (The smart car section is usually away in a hidden corner, and no salesperson comes forward).

Its a pity when Smart moved onto Renault engines with the latest 453 Fortwo and Forfour you see on the TV adverts, Smart did not move to Renault dealerships, and get away from mercedes.
 
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