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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to overtake another vehicle recently, I dropped down a gear and pressed the accelerator...and nothing happened. Then after a few seconds, there was a huge surge of power, which continued even after I lifted my foot off the accelerator. The vehicle felt as if was possessed and could only be held back by pressing on the brake, however, as soon as I lifted my foot off the brake, the engine continued to have a surge of power.

Eventually, I managed to pull into a car park and slam all on and turn off the over revving engine. To cut a long story short, I continued with the journey and took it to a garage. The mechanic stated that he had been in touch with Ford Technical and they thought that it had been diesel getting into the oil, which had caused this event. He also said that I should check the oil level on a weekly basis, to ensure that the level does not get too high, otherwise, it may happen again!!!

I then had it checked again at another Ford garage, who stated that they thought that because it was only doing 3,500 miles a year, and that there had been a build up of carbon and that the engine was designed to burn off access carbon in this way. Anyone have any thoughts on this or the statements from the two garages?

DB1154
 

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Hi, and welcome to the forum :D

I can only speak generically about 'fly by wire' foot accelerator pedals and throttle...

Most modern cars have moved onto an electronic connection between foot pedal and control of the car engine, acceleration and throttle. There are no more physical bowden cable controls between them, like in the old days.

Any sticking or excessive acceleration or no acceleration is due to either the pedal actuator potentiometer, giving the wrong voltage to control the engine, or problems at the accelerator/throttle body actuator at the engine not moving correctly with the control voltage.

If this is the problem, technicians would have to connect to a diagnostic computer that reads the control voltage and test at which end the problem is, either a dodgy foot pedal potentiometer, or the engine acceleration/throttle actuators. I would get that checked out. If one of these are faulty they just replace with another nowadays. They do not repair them.

That's one problem to resolve. Next problem is your car being a diesel. Diesels have burn cycles. My wifes last Smart car a 2009 was a EU5 emissions diesel, and it had burn cycles, you do a manual burn cycle at least once a week to burn off soot, by driving faster and longer on say a motorway. (you should do that to). Also the car does automatic burn cycles, these come in for about five minutes when the computer dictates it, by sending more fuel in to burn of the soot at a higher temperature. Normally you never hear it, but if you are at idle say at traffic lights, your rev counter is a bit higher than normal, and you can hear it at higher revs. On the smart car at 900 rpm on idle it had moved up to 1100 rpm. Thats about 18% higher. On the move at higher speeds, and revs, you should never notice the burn cycle, it just adds more fuel automatically, but is controlled by the accelerator electronics. So again this has to be checked by technicians, that the burn cycle is working correctly, and not sticking the accelerator on. (the burn cycle should add more fuel for about five minutes to burn off the soot in the DPF filter, then switch off till next time).

Finally, phew!..Oil contamination would not affect the accelerator function at all. Faster Oil contamination in a diesel is relatively a new thing, and came about on EU6 diesels, ie on the facelift Ecosport (mid 2017 onwards) and all other EU6 diesels, this is due EU6 diesels having far more automatic burn cycles to meet emissions, which contaminates the oil quicker, so you need to change the oil and oil filter more frequently. Adblue and this addition of burn cycles is the reason many of us have went back to petrol cars. I myself after many years of diesels, have went for a petrol Ecosport.

Usually you change oil and filter at each yearly service, but on some cars it has been bad with oil contamination and the oil contamination warning light has came up in only six months, like the Range Rover Evoque, and they have to change the oil and filter every six months. If your is a facelift Ecosport diesel, then change the oil and filter every year.

Sorry for the long writeup, but the conclusion is, if it happens again, its dangerous, or if you are still not happy about it, I would get the accelerator system looked at for accelerator pedal function, engine actuators for acceleration/throttle body function and burn cycle function.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, and welcome to the forum :D

I can only speak generically about 'fly by wire' foot accelerator pedals and throttle...

Most modern cars have moved onto an electronic connection between foot pedal and control of the car engine, acceleration and throttle. There are no more physical bowden cable controls between them, like in the old days.

Any sticking or excessive acceleration or no acceleration is due to either the pedal actuator potentiometer, giving the wrong voltage to control the engine, or problems at the accelerator/throttle body actuator at the engine not moving correctly with the control voltage.

If this is the problem, technicians would have to connect to a diagnostic computer that reads the control voltage and test at which end the problem is, either a dodgy foot pedal potentiometer, or the engine acceleration/throttle actuators. I would get that checked out. If one of these are faulty they just replace with another nowadays. They do not repair them.

That's one problem to resolve. Next problem is your car being a diesel. Diesels have burn cycles. My wifes last Smart car a 2009 was a EU5 emissions diesel, and it had burn cycles, you do a manual burn cycle at least once a week to burn off soot, by driving faster and longer on say a motorway. (you should do that to). Also the car does automatic burn cycles, these come in for about five minutes when the computer dictates it, by sending more fuel in to burn of the soot at a higher temperature. Normally you never hear it, but if you are at idle say at traffic lights, your rev counter is a bit higher than normal, and you can hear it at higher revs. On the smart car at 900 rpm on idle it had moved up to 1100 rpm. Thats about 18% higher. On the move at higher speeds, and revs, you should never notice the burn cycle, it just adds more fuel automatically, but is controlled by the accelerator electronics. So again this has to be checked by technicians, that the burn cycle is working correctly, and not sticking the accelerator on. (the burn cycle should add more fuel for about five minutes to burn off the soot in the DPF filter, then switch off till next time).

Finally, phew!..Oil contamination would not affect the accelerator function at all. Faster Oil contamination in a diesel is relatively a new thing, and came about on EU6 diesels, ie on the facelift Ecosport (mid 2017 onwards) and all other EU6 diesels, this is due EU6 diesels having far more automatic burn cycles to meet emissions, which contaminates the oil quicker, so you need to change the oil and oil filter more frequently. Adblue and this addition of burn cycles is the reason many of us have went back to petrol cars. I myself after many years of diesels, have went for a petrol Ecosport.

Usually you change oil and filter at each yearly service, but on some cars it has been bad with oil contamination and the oil contamination warning light has came up in only six months, like the Range Rover Evoque, and they have to change the oil and filter every six months. If your is a facelift Ecosport diesel, then change the oil and filter every year.

Sorry for the long writeup, but the conclusion is, if it happens again, its dangerous, or if you are still not happy about it, I would get the accelerator system looked at for accelerator pedal function, engine actuators for acceleration/throttle body function and burn cycle function.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Colin,

Thank you for the welcome and the in-depth reply. I shall be able to use this information the next time I attend the garage. Thank you again for explaining it all to me.

Regards,

DB
 
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